7.) What are the implications for the reader in the line, “For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you”? A) The reader and the speaker are both the same age. B) The reader is invited to ta

7.) What are the implications for the reader in the line, “For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you”?

A) The reader and the speaker are both the same age.

B) The reader is invited to take the speaker’s possessions.

C) The reader and the speaker share the same physical body.

D) The reader and the speaker share the same essence.

8.) I loafe and invite my soul,

I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass.

What implication is suggested in these two lines?

A) Loafing is an inappropriate activity.

B) Loafing is only appropriate for poets.

C) Loafing is a neutral activity, neither good nor bad.

D) Loafing is permissible, especially when studying nature.

9.) My tongue, every atom of my blood, form’d from this soil, this air,

Born here of parents born here from parents the same, and their parents the same,

I, now thirty-seven years old in perfect health begin,

Hoping to cease not till death.

What implications do these lines of the poem have regarding the question of national identity?

A) These lines suggest that nations don’t exist in nature; only people do.

B) These lines suggest that national identity might exist in nature, but isn’t important.

C) These lines suggest that anyone can claim whatever national identity seems convenient at any given time.

D) These lines suggest that national identity is forged through having deep ancestral roots in a place.