Create a collage that consists of both words and images that best illustrate who your character is and what your character is about.

Create a collage that consists of both words and images that best illustrate who your character is and what your character is about. The point of a verbal-visual collage is not that you document exactly what the character looks like, but that you capture the essence of the character in a collection of words and images arranged on the page in an aesthetically pleasing and creative fashion. Make sure that your collage illustrates language that your character uses as well as the specific nature of the issue your character will face. In a paragraph for each, describe what internal and external conflicts the character you created will be struggling with in your upcoming children’s play.

For example, your character may be in conflict with a group of kids his own age who are teasing him because of the way he dresses (this would be the external conflict), but really his big issue is his lack of self-esteem (internal conflict). Your inner and external conflict should reflect the major issue or concern you have chosen to depict in your play; it is an opportunity for you to begin to sketch out how your character will wrestle with this issue internally and externally. A monologue is an extended speech that expresses a character’s thoughts and feelings aloud for the audience to hear. Some monologues help to advance the plot, others help the viewer get to know and better understand what motivates the character on stage. Keeping in mind what you have just written write a short monologue for your character, which reveals not only her/his character, but expresses both her/his attempts to deal with your chosen issue as part of both external and internal conflicts. If it makes it easier for you, you should imagine your character is alone on stage after some sort of situation or conflict and the monologue she/he delivers serves to express her/his unspoken desires.