Critically examine a relevant UK Government policy and highlight how a neo-liberal political ideology is reflected in the design of this policy in relation to physical education and school sport

Critically examine a relevant UK Government policy and highlight how a neo-liberal political ideology is reflected in the design of this policy in relation to physical education and school sport

 

The United Kingdom is renowned for its love of sport. Millions of us play it, millions of us watch it, quite a few of us are better than anyone in the world at it, many heroic people volunteer a large chunk of their life to enable it and no-one is better at hosting international events than us. Recent years have been particularly successful. We have staged more than 70 major sporting events since London 2012 and had our best performances in a century at both the Winter and Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games. More than a half a million extra people are playing sport regularly since 2010, and there have been gains in traditionally under-represented groups such as women, disabled people and people from black and minority ethnic (BME) backgrounds. The contribution of sport to the economy has grown to £39 billion annually.

But complacency is just as much of an enemy to those that run sport as it is to an athlete. Government has a duty to ensure that absolutely everyone can benefit from the power of sport and more needs to be done not just to increase participation but to harness its awesome power to change people’s lives for the better. So this new strategy for sport and physical activity moves beyond merely looking at how many people take part. It will consider what people get out of participating and what more can be done to make a physically active life truly transformative. In the future, funding decisions will be made on the basis of the social good that sport and physical activity can deliver, not simply on the number of participants. We are redefining what success looks like in sport by concentrating on five key outcomes: physical wellbeing, mental wellbeing, individual development, social and community development and economic development.