Management of Planned/Unplanned Terminat

 Description *This is a social work course* PAGE 1: Explain how you might evaluate client progress and determine when a client is ready to terminate services. Describe a situation when a professional relationship may end before the client achieves their goals. Describe one potential positive and one potential negative feeling that you, as the social worker, might feel regarding a planned termination and an unplanned termination. Describe one potential positive and one potential negative feeling a client might feel regarding both a planned and an unplanned termination of a therapeutic relationship. PAGE 2: PLEASE RESPOND TO THE FOLLOWING DISCUSSION POSTS SEPERATELY!!! Provide a suggestion for dealing with the negative feelings that can occur with terminating client relationships. Identify a social work skill and provide a specific example of how your colleague might use this skill to address challenges in termination. POST A: One possible way to evaluate a client’s progress is through a summative evaluation (Kirst-Ashman and Hull, 2018). A summative evaluation is one that occurs at the end of the therapeutic process to determine if the desired change has occurred (Kirst-Ashman and Hull). By use of this type of evaluation, a social worker can monitor whether or not the desired change has taken place, and adjust the interventions to suit. One possible scenario in which a professional relationship would terminate before a patient has reached their goals is if the services were being paid for by health insurance, and the benefits had reached their limit. Perhaps the patient would not have the resources to continue and would thus have to stop the sessions. One potential positive feeling that I might feel as a therapist would be that I had done something to help the patient, and that hopefully they would have some tools to use that they did not have before we met. A negative feeling that might occur for me was that we had not finished the sessions, and maybe the client still needed help with their problems and were not able to fully resolve the issues they needed help with. A potential positive feeling the client might have is that they know that help is available and that hopefully they were at least a little better off after our sessions than when they were before. A very potential negative feeling they may have is that the therapist had abandon them or perhaps they would be left with some negative feeling about the profession if they were unable to see me because of lack of resources. POST B: One way to evaluate progress in a client is to a data gathering method. Data gathering would show where a client started before receiving services and where a client is at in the middle and at the end of services (Kirst-Ashman and Hull, 2018). The data collected would be able to show the social worker what the client is thinking and if the client thinks they have made progress within the services offered. That way, it is not just the social worker thinking the client is done with services, but the client would also see the progress that is made. In the work that I do, our professional relationship ends by the client decides that they don’t want to receive services anymore due to the rules that go with the program. The program I work in is a voluntary program, but the clients have certain rules that they sign off on before receiving services and they naturally will break some of the rules because they feel they don’t need to follow them anymore.