Mind Map

First, complete the “K” and the “W” part of the KWL Chart by briefly writing down the following in each section: “K” – provide what you think you know about assessments “W” – provide questions of what you want to learn about assessments in this course. Locate the KWL chart you completed for your introduction. Explore the concept of mind mapping to utilize for this task and as a strategy to use in your own classroom. Review the following mind mapping resources: Mind Mapping (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. How to Use Mind Maps to Unleash Your Brain’s Creativity and Potential (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. You may create this mind map using the following tools: Electronically using tools like Microsoft Word or PowerPoint Electronically using the following online tools: MindMeister (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. MindMup (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Canva (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. GoConqr (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Draw a mind map on paper with markers, take a photo or scan it, and upload it for your classmates to review. 7 Steps to Making a Mind Map Follow these seven steps listed below from How to Use Mind Maps to Unleash Your Brain’s Creativity and Potential (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. as a guide as you create your mind map: Step 1: Start in the middle of a blank page. By starting in the middle of the page, you can branch out your ideas in multiple directions. Step 2: Select an image, picture or words representing the “central idea” of your map. Images can represent so many words and can contribute to your creativity as you develop your mind map. If an image just does not do the trick, certainly use words. Step 3: Utilize colors throughout your entire mind map. The brain is attracted to color and can enhance learning. Besides, who doesn’t like to add a little color to their life! Step 4: Create branches to the various levels within your mind map that all end up connecting to your “central idea.” The brain likes making patterns and the connection among the branches will help you to easily remember and retrieve the acquired knowledge. Step 5: Use curved lines instead of straight lines when connecting your branches Your brain responds better to curved lines. They are more interesting! Step 6: Each branch should have only one key word that represents your learning. This will keep your mind map clear and succinct. Step 7: Images should be integrated throughout your mind map. Images are just another way for your brain to make deeper connections to the acquired knowledge; therefore, making it more meaningful (Pinola, 2013, September). Reflect Review the various resources, discussions, instructor feedback and videos throughout the entire course that will help support you as you create your mind map.