The Unusual Fairy Tale

In the spirit of Tessa Brown’s story, your assignment is to embellish the fairy tale “Little Red Ridding Hood.” You will embellish the story by adding details and citations that change the usual impression that we have of familiar characters. You will know that you have succeeded if we find Cinderella’s step-sisters more likable than Cinderella, or if we are more afraid for the Wolf than we are for Little Red Riding Hood, or if it seems like Goldilocks is more of a hero than a thief. There are three rules to this activity: 1) You can move existing sentences around as much as you want and change the order of the story, but you cannot remove any existing sentences. 2) You can add sentences to the story that offer new information. The sentences that you add do not need to be true (you are re-writing a fairy tale after all), but any sentence that you add must follow the rules for statements of fact, meaning that they must be a sentence that in theory we could empirically verify. 3) You must add at least three strategic citations to the story. Those citations must be formatted correctly according to APA guidelines. They can be made up references, such as The Journal of Wolf Studies or a letter from Little Red Riding Hood’s grandmother. They can also be real documents, such as the U.S. Constitution. You are free to cite anything you like (medical research, presidential speeches, Cardi B songs) to embellish and change the story. Whether made up or real, there are three ways to format your in-text citation. It depends on whether you include the author attribution in the sentence or not. Three examples (from the Purdue Owl website) to illustrate: A) According to Jones (1998), “Students often had difficulty using APA style, especially when it was their first time” (p. 199). B) Jones (1998) found “students often had difficulty using APA style” (p. 199); what implications does this have for teachers? If the author is not named in the sentence, place the author’s last name, the year of publication, and the page number in parentheses after the quotation like so: C) The report concludes that students “often had difficulty using APA style” (Jones, 1998, p. 199), but did not elaborate as to why. Any references that you make up should also follow APA guidelines. For instance, if you reference personal correspondence from Little Red Riding Hood’s grandmother, you should cite it like so: D) Grandma expressly asked in her email that Riding Hood bring “ginger almond cookies” with her when she visited, not chocolate chip (personal communication, November 3, 2002). Your works cited should include both real and fictional citations while following APA guidelines.