Throughout “The Importance of the Act of Reading”, Freire introduces the idea that “reading the world precedes reading the word” (5). What does he mean by this?

Option 2:

Throughout “The Importance of the Act of Reading”, Freire introduces the idea that “reading the world precedes reading the word” (5). What does he mean by this? How can his insights about context further illuminate the connection between language and our perception of reality proposed by Orwell and/or Lutz? There are many possible answers to these questions, and many ways to approach such a response. You should draw on the primary texts from these authors (Freire, Orwell, Lutz), in articulating your own unique response, and you may draw on other course readings or outside research, if you wish (though this is not required). Follow techniques that will be taught in class over the next few weeks to offer a clear, nuanced argument with persuasive prose – a full list of required elements follows. What you argue is ultimately up to you – when defended appropriately, nearly all responses could be considered valid, including those that question the premise itself. The point is to clearly articulate a thesis and offer a persuasive argument for that thesis, building on what these thinkers have written.

Specifics:

Your essay should provide the following, at the minimum (based on course lessons and readings prior to the assignment due date):

3 o A thesis claim that is directly related to the main theme(s) of the essays

o Summaries and/or paraphrases that orient an unfamiliar reader to the ideas under investigation, including descriptive elements for a reader who may not have read the assigned essays o Quotations that are related to the claims you are engaging, and that are unpacked in a way that shows how you are engaging in conversation with the author being quoted

o A clear presentation of your argument o Illustrative prose that shows the rationale behind your interpretations o Specific engagement with Freire, and Orwell and/or Lutz o Incorporation of support for your argument through careful, nuanced argumentation and support from additional sources, if needed o An indication of what is at stake in the argument you’re making – this should be alluded to in your introduction/thesis claim, and then expanded upon in your conclusion